pISSN 2671-8790 eISSN 2671-8804

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Korean J Transplant

Published online August 31, 2021

© The Korean Society for Transplantation

Salvage aorto-hepatic jump graft for hepatic artery thrombosis following living donor liver transplantation: a case report with 10-year follow-up

Jin Uk Choi , Shin Hwang , Chul-Soo Ahn , Deok-Bog Moon , Gil-Chun Park

Division of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Liver Transplantation, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence to: Shin Hwang
Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpagu, Seoul 05505, Korea
Tel: +82-2-3010-3930
Fax: +82-2-3010-6701
E-mail: shwang@amc.seoul.kr

Received: May 6, 2021; Revised: May 27, 2021; Accepted: June 18, 2021

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hepatic artery thrombosis (HAT) following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a lethal complication. We present the case of a patient who underwent salvage redo hepatic artery reconstruction using an aorto-hepatic jump graft because of HAT following LDLT. A 64-year-old female patient diagnosed with hepatitis C virus-associated liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma underwent salvage LDLT using a modified right liver graft. Partial graft infarct was identified at posttransplant day 4, and by day 9, it had spread. Celiac arteriography showed complete occlusion of the graft hepatic artery. We performed redo hepatic artery reconstruction using a fresh iliofemoral artery homograft 10 days after the LDLT operation because such a vessel homograft was available at our institutional tissue bank. The infrarenal aorta was dissected and an iliofemoral artery graft was anastomosed. Soon after hepatic artery revascularization, liver function progressively improved, and the infarct area at the liver graft was reduced. The patient has been doing well for 10 years without any vascular complications. In conclusion, our experience with this case suggests that salvage redo hepatic artery reconstruction using an aorto-hepatic jump graft is a feasible option to treat HAT following LDLT, as in deceased donor liver transplantation.

Keywords: Aorto-hepatic reconstruction, Hepatic artery thrombosis, Redo anastomosis, Hepatic failure, Retransplantation